Category Archives: Polyester

Pssst…want to try something?

If you read our recent post about “How to Demo a Racquet,” you may be incentivized to do it!

So while you are at it try one of our performance racquets setup with MonoGut ZX or ZX Pro (thinner) to get the maximum performance from the racquet.

Ashaway MonoGut ZX and ZX Pro have been one of our most popular strings for well over five (5) years!

Top players have been using it, but now the word is spreading that is not just for “the good player” but for everyone! We are very sensitive to injuries and injury prevention, so that is why we recommend MonoGut ZX to almost all players. The durability and feel of this string are unique, and, MonoGut ZX and ZX Pro is a monofilament but is PEEK and no polyester.

As with any string, some will not want to change, but if you are looking for a new racquet, why not demo a racquet setup with MonoGut ZX or ZX Pro?

MonoGut ZX & ZX Pro

Ashaway MonoGut ZX and ZX Pro come in Black and Natural and 16 (1.27mm) and 17 (1.24mm) gauge.

Is Your Racquet Healthy?

I started thinking about this as I made my way to a routine doctor’s appointment last week. Here is the scenario I formed while waiting:

The doctor has been seeing all sorts of patients already today and I suspect the first glance at each one elicited some sort of reaction, quielty probably, like this; “Good Greif, that guy is fat! Bad trousers, terrible shoes, nice shirt, whats with the hair, dude?” etc, etc.

So what do you think happens when a racquet shows up for a checkup?

“Good grief, that is an old racquet, who would ever buy one of those, this person is too good for that racquet,” etc, etc.

As humans we can communicate how we feel to the doctor but your racquet can not, so it has other ways to tell you if it is healthy or not. Here are a few signs of an unhealthy racquet:

  1. Grommet set, and specifically the protective head bumper is worn out. If this is not fixed quicky the racquet will die!

    Worn Out Bumper Guard

  2.  Grommet set individual barrels are broken or missing. If this is not fixed the strings will die!
  3.  Overgrip is disgustingly dirty requiring exam gloves to remove it! Doctors use exam gloves too and you know what that means!
  4. Under grip is essentially rendered to powder, requiring exam gloves to remove it.
That is a real image!  It is obvious that a new overgrip is needed.

Obvious!

What is not so obvious sometimes is that strings need to be replaced.  Even before they break!  What!

Yes, strings loose tension over time and in some case rather quickly!  By knowing what the original string bed stiffness was we can determine how much “stiffness” has been lost.  For most players a degradation of 20% is maximum.

Depending on the string material a loss of 8 to 9% overnight is not uncommon…so that leaves 11 to 12% for playing.

Take a look at our String Frequency Calculator to get a better idea of stringing frequency required to keep your racquet really working for you.

To keep you playing at your best you need to keep your racquet at it’s best!

 

 

 

Dr. Goodman visits the World Headquarters!

We were thrilled to have Dr. Brad Goodman visit the World Headquarters to produce a session for his Doc-Talk-Live program!

Dr. Goodman is a tennis player who wants to know more about equipment in an effort to protect his body and beat his opponents.  You can catch this episode here: Doc Talk Live

In addition to the session Dr, Goodman was given the opportunity to “stretch” both a very stiff string and a very “stretchy” string, something that he, and many others, have not done.  Needless to say he was amazed at the difference.

Dr, Goodman’s visit was a great opportunity to have a real conversation about tennis equipment.  Please let me have your comments!

 

What is Elongation?

In dictionary terms it is:

“the amount of extension of an object under stress.”

In tennis terms, it means the same thing when talking about tennis racquet strings.

How much does a string stretch under the reference tension load or otherwise stretched (impact)?  The proliferation of wrist, arm and shoulder injury has brought attention to the property of “stiffness.”  The problem is that your stiffness may be different than my stiffness, so there needs to be an “index” associated with each string, in my opinion.  I have that data on over 500 tennis strings, but that is just me.

The images show the results of high elongation (left) and low elongation (right) string upon breaking.

Several years ago a player asked me “where is the string that is missing?”  Well, it is not missing.  The ends you see should be connected!

If the string has little elongation when it breaks there is nothing “pulling” it apart like the high elongation string. So each time you hit the ball, the string either elongates a bunch or it doesn’t.

In the case of the high elongation string, on the left, it absorbs a good portion of the “shock” associated with a hard hit, whereas the low elongation string, on the right, lets your body do the absorbing to a great extent.

So, it is reasonable to use very low reference tensions for low elongation string (35 to 45 pounds; 16 to 20.5 Kg) and higher tensions (45 to 60 pounds; 20.5 to 27.2 Kg) for high elongation strings.

You may ask, “how do I know how stiff a string is?”  If you see the word “polyester or co-polyester” it is likely that string wil be stiff compared to natural gut, most nylon based multi-filament construction, and PEEK (Zyex) material.  In my opinion, there is no “bad” string just “bad” applications.  If in doubt…ask!

This is Important!

I was just going through some older posts and came across this “E” Book post and believe it is more relevant now that when I originally posted it!

Take a look because this is important!

What is Soft…er?

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