Category Archives: Learning

String Bed Stiffness – A Short Video

It is raining today and it felt like a good time to talk about “string bed stiffness”…so let’s go!

This quick video will make a plea to you tennis players to demand more from your racquet technician so you are getting the most from your equipment.

Thank you for watching!

Dr. Goodman visits the World Headquarters!

We were thrilled to have Dr. Brad Goodman visit the World Headquarters to produce a session for his Doc-Talk-Live program!

Dr. Goodman is a tennis player who wants to know more about equipment in an effort to protect his body and beat his opponents.  You can catch this episode here: Doc Talk Live

In addition to the session Dr, Goodman was given the opportunity to “stretch” both a very stiff string and a very “stretchy” string, something that he, and many others, have not done.  Needless to say he was amazed at the difference.

Dr, Goodman’s visit was a great opportunity to have a real conversation about tennis equipment.  Please let me have your comments!

 

Will Poor Stringing Save the Life of Polyester?

OK, here’s the deal.  I have written about this several times and each time I decided that it was a waste of time, so it goes back into a file somewhere!

The time is now that we really need to understand more about stringing as a consumer and what we can do as racquet technicians to make the life of a player better, more fun, and safer.

This a quick story to set the premise of the rest.

Several weeks ago I received a freshly strung (24 hours) racquet to perhaps make a few modifications to the racquet.  The racquet was strung by the player, a very good junior with a high ranking.  The racquet was 18×20 with a full bed of polyester at 53 pounds.  When I asked why the response was “I have always done it this way”.  Fair enough!

The string bed stiffness (SBS) using the Beer’s ERT300 was 23, the SBS using the Babolat RDC was 29, and the SBS using the FlexFour was 50.  If you are familiar with these data, you know the numbers are quite low.

The racquet had only one mis-weave and one crossover, but it was severely distorted, i.e., very wide.

For a quick comparison, a properly strung racquet would have numbers like 36, 58, and 67 respectively.

So, the “softness” of the string bed when improperly strung was something that may not transmit as much shock to the body as a racquet that was properly strung at the requested 53 pounds and has a higher SBS!

Therefore a poor stringing may save the life of polyester based string!  It may not be good for performance or racquet integrity but it seems that very few players care!

So what do we do?

For years I have been advocating for the use of a finished SBS instead of a “reference tension”.  Why?  Because each stringer and stringing machine probably produce a different result.

If a player comes to us and requests an SBS of 37 (Beers ERT300 for example), we can adjust the stringing machine to produce that SBS number.  Our machines may be set at 40 to achieve the requested 37, and another shop may have to set their machine to something different.  The object is to arrive at the finished SBS, and it is up to the racquet technician to be able to do that!  The result will be a better performing racquet that will last longer.

Now You Think of it!

So, it has been a while since you had your racquet strung and you are standing on the court about to receive and you ask yourself; “I wonder when I should get my racquet strung”.

Now is probably not the best time to think of it but if you do simply take a look at the short video for a quick answer;

Accuracy Index…what is it?

For a few years, Racquet Quest has been using an “accuracy index” to clarify and understand how the string bed stiffness at a given location can affect where the ball goes. You may say that is the players skill working…or not!

However, players take heart, we know how the string bed accuracy can and will put the ball where you didn’t intend for it to go!

Our Accuracy Index is predicated on racquet support effectiveness and main and cross string junctions matching the “target tensions”. The natural ratio of the racquet is the basis for the target tensions. The “natural ratio” of a racquet is the difference in main string tension and cross string tension in a freshly strung racquet. For example; the main string tension is 50 and the cross string tension is 38 the “natural ratio” is 76%.

The Efficiency Index is the measure of the stringing machines support capabilities. The lower the number the worse the machine support is, therefore the racquet is under a lot of stress and we know what stress does to everything! It is bad!

https://racquetquest.tennis/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Vega_16x19_accuracy_.pdf

%d bloggers like this: