Premature String Failure Getting You Down?

Of all my clients a small percentage, maybe up to ten (10) percent, suffer from premature string failure.

If you are one of these ten (10) percent this post may shed some light on the reason(s) or at least offer some sympathy!

First, what is premature string failure?

In the case of the ten (10) percent it is “the string broke”.  Period.

Ashaway Red Rough Cross Close Up

Fail!

Players are experiencing failure in less than ten (10) hours and some in less than two (2) hours.  Unless you are a touring professional this may be too often!  I understand that so we try to accommodate your desired “cost per hour” threshold.

So, premature failure is less than ten (10) hours of playing time before breaking.

Here are some contributors to this failure…

String Gauge:   the thinner (higher number) the more quickly it will break, typically.

String Tension:  lower tensions, or SBS, String Bed Stiffness, the more the strings will move which creates friction which causes notching, which, well you know.

String Movement: See above.  There is some belief that string moving will create more top spin.

String Pattern:  the fewer number of strings the more open the pattern will be and allow more movement.

Racquet Stiffness:  a very stiff racquet (RDC 70+) will put more of the impact load on the string, significantly, leading to decreased string life.

Spin: to generate spin you must swing from low to high with plenty of force (harder) causing the strings to move more.

Training:  if you are hitting for two (2) hours in training it may be like playing several tournaments.

Mis-Hits: hitting the ball close to the racquet frame creates increased stress on the string and results in “shearing” the string.

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Shank!

As you know there are many more reasons a string may break prematurely and some of it has to do with the away the strings are installed in your racquet but that is another post.

What should you do about premature string breakage?

If your situation is chronic you should consider a more dense string pattern.  A pattern of 18 x 20 is a good pattern for increased durability.  The dense pattern does not allow the strings to move so freely.

Of course if you are currently using a very open pattern, typically fewer cross strings, in hopes of maximum top spin then you are in for frequent stringing!  I hope you enjoy the “spin”!

You may consider a hybrid format with a monofilament main string and a different cross string.  Monofilaments are typically polyester based and can be a contributor to arm pain.  Monogut ZX by Ashaway is a monofilament made using PEEK (no polyester) and makes a really good hybrid format, and does not put extra stress on the arm.

Consider using a larger diameter (lower number) string.  It makes sense that the thicker the string the longer it will take to “saw” through it.  A sacrifice in “playability may occur!

Once you determine how much per hour you are willing to spend on string we can design a string setup for you that can contribute to your tennis enjoyment and still leave some money for other things!

Respond to this post with your “cost per hour” threshold and I will respond with a possible solution.  How’s that?

Posted on December 16, 2014, in Learning, Pain, Patterns, PEEK, String, String Patterns and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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